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LESPI's Letter re NYC Rezoning Proposal

May 26, 2015

Carl Weisbrod, Director
NYC Department of City Planning
22 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007

re: Proposed “Zoning for Quality and Affordability”

Dear Mr. Weisbrod:

Lower East Side Preservation Initiative is writing to protest the NYC Department of City Planning’s “Zoning for Quality and Affordability” text amendments. Our concerns focus on the city’s historic neighborhoods, some but not all of which are NYC historic districts.

Our primary objection to this proposal is that, despite recent modifications to the plan, the rezoning treats the city with too broad a brush. Certain areas of the city may be suitable for this kind of upzoning. But many areas are not, including those where:

* Their special character is defined by low rise buildings, where light and open space predominate. This includes many historic neighborhoods both landmarked and not landmarked.

* The area has been built to a density where light and air have become limited, and severe wind tunnel effects have become more commonplace. Much of Manhattan as well as certain neighborhoods of Brooklyn and Queens fall within this group.

* Increased development pressure will result in further loss of the area’s existing low and moderate income residents and small businesses, which contribute significantly to neighborhood character and are often its “heart and soul.” A lot of new development results in the loss of these groups.

Although we appreciate the idea of involving community boards in the rezoning process, we are not confident that the voice of the Boards and local residents will be heard in the city’s rush to accommodate deep-pocketed real estate development interests.

We respectfully request that DCP withdraw this broad brush proposal and instead review potential rezonings on a community-by-community basis.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

cc: Hon. Melissa Mark-Viverito, NYC Council
Hon. Rosie Mendez, NYC Council
Hon. Margaret Chin, NYC Council

 

LESPI's Letter re De-calendaring - followup

April 30, 2015

Meenakshi Srinivasan, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chair Srinivasan:

Regarding the Landmarks Preservation Commission's upcoming plan to act on properties that have been calendared for public hearing for five years or more, Lower East Side Preservation Initiative supports the action plan formulated by the Historic Districts Council and Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer to give each of the historic sites a fair hearing in an expeditious manner.

The Commission's original plan to remove all these varied buildings from consideration at once, with no public input and with no consideration for their individual merits, simply to clear an administrative backlog, would be an inappropriate sidestepping of the Commission's duty to evaluate the potential landmarks of New York City. Instead, the Commission should respect the time and effort that countless citizens spent in bringing these buildings forward for consideration, expecting, in good faith, that these buildings be given the same due process that other proposed landmarks have received. These buildings should be evaluated on their merits in public hearings as potential New York City landmarks with the same opportunity for open comment as buildings which were calendared more recently.

Because of the large number of buildings on this list, LESPI supports the plan suggested by HDC and the Manhattan Borough President for the buildings to be heard in geographically clustered groups. This will allow local advocates and stakeholders to speak about all the calendared buildings in their neighborhoods or Community Board districts while reasonably conserving the time it will take for all the buildings to be individually heard.

LESPI also respectfully urges the Commission to take reasonable steps to ensure that calendared buildings, from now on, are given their public hearings within a reasonable time to help prevent a backlog of calendared buildings from accumulating again.

We thank the Commission for its consideration in this matter.

Sincerely,

Britton Baine
Treasurer

cc: Richard D. Moses, Lower East Side Preservation Initiative

 

LESPI's Letter re De-calendaring

December 3, 2014

Meenakshi Srinivasan, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chair Srinivasan:

I’m writing on behalf of the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative (LESPI) to express our strong objection to the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s proposed administrative action to remove properties calendared for more than five years from consideration for landmarking. This action has several strongly negative effects, it:

- results in probable loss of a significant number of buildings already deemed historic by LPC, including many broadly known sites as well as two building's in the historic Lower East Side.

- wipes away a list of properties that represents countless hours of individual and community effort to have them calendared in the first place, which in effect disenfranchises communities that have been seeking landmark protection for their historic sites and neighborhoods.

- subverts the time-tested procedure for landmarking buildings and districts: calendared properties, which have already been deemed to have historic merit by the LPC, should be entitled to their "day in court.” Undermining this process sets a bad precedent, that will discourage communities from bringing forward buildings if they believe the process cannot be consistently relied upon to ensure a full review of each building or district based on merit.

- is of a magnitude that warrants an LPC public hearing with proper public notification to allow affected communities and others to weigh in; otherwise this action will encourage public disengagement and a degradation of democratic involvement in our civic processes.

We respectfully but strongly urge the LPC to cancel the vote this Tuesday, and instead hold a public hearing to review this action and consider the buildings individually on the merits.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

cc:
The Honorable Gale Brewer, Manhattan Borough President
The Honorable Margaret Chin, NYC Council Member
The Honorable Rosie Mendez, NYC Council Member

 

LESPI's Letter re landmarking Eastern Dispensary building

February 3, 2014 rev.

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation: Eastern Dispensary Building, 75 Essex Street, Manhattan

Dear Chair Tierney:

I am writing to support Individual Landmark designation for the Eastern Dispensary Building at 75 Essex Street in Manhattan.

The building remains very much intact from its original 1890 construction. Designed by architects Rose and Stone, it has a simple yet strong Italianate style architecture enlivened by ground floor rusticated masonry and arched windows. It has a notably commanding presence on the street, and serves as a vivid reminder of the immediate area’s important immigrant history.

One of a relatively small number of dispensary buildings created during the late 18th and 19th centuries by the city to assist the healthcare of poor residents, the Eastern Dispensary exemplifies the early phase of New York’s then increasing sense of charity and civic responsibility. In our time, when the role in government in helping the poor and providing health care is frequently subject to fierce debate, historical markers such as this provide a critical lesson in the successes and failures of past attitudes, policies and institutions.

The building is within the Lower East Side National Register Historic District, and was listed as a site with architectural / historic significance in the Seward Park Mixed-Use Redevelopment Project’s Environmental Impact Statement. We respectfully request that the Commission act to designate the building an Individual Landmark at the earliest opportunity. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc: Councilmember Margaret Chin, New York City Council This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Susan Stetzer, Manhattan Community Board 3 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

LESPI's Letter re landmarking Tifereth Israel synagogue building

October 25, 2013

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation: Tifereth Israel Town and Village Synagogue Building, Manhattan

Dear Chair Tierney:

I am writing to strongly support Individual Landmark designation for the Tifereth Israel Town and Village synagogue building at 334 East 14th Street in Manhattan.

The building has a striking and robust architectural design and a very strong presence on the street. Its history reflects the area’s cultural and demographic transitions over the last century and a half, and thereby serves as an important historical marker for the Lower East Side community.

The Tifereth Israel Town and Village synagogue building was originally built in 1866 as the German Baptist Church. Occupying the outskirts of the Lower East Side’s Kleindeutschland neighborhood, the structure would have visually dominated the surrounding streetscape from its first construction. That it continues to have such as strong presence today speaks forcefully to the building’s architectural character and to its continuing prominent role in the life of our community. The building’s transformation over time, from its original use as the German Baptist Church, to its conversion to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church in 1926, and finally to its present use as Tifereth Israel Town and Village synagogue, can be traced in the subtle changes in the building facades, most notably with the replacement of the steeples with onion domes in the early 20th century and the introduction of the Star of David motif in the windows during the later 20th century.

The building has historically played and continues to play an important role in the life of the Lower East Side, and we believe it is essential that the building survives for future generations to appreciate and enjoy. Its importance was recognized by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1966 when it calendared the property. We applaud the Commission’s recent scheduling of a public hearing for the building, and respectfully request that the Commission acts to designate the building an Individual Landmark at the earliest opportunity. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

 

LESPI's Letter re landmarking Stabile Row

August 21, 2013

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation: Banca Stabile Row, Little Italy, Manhattan

Dear Chair Tierney:

Manhattan’s Little Italy is well known throughout this country as our most historically important Italian American neighborhood. Today, there are only reminders of this once sprawling and culturally diverse community, which had greatly influenced our city’s political and cultural life.

The architectural and historic significance of Little Italy, a NYC Special Purpose Zoning District and part of the Chinatown and Little Italy National Register Historic District, is apparent from the area’s rows of historic buildings ranging in date from the early 19th to the early 20th century. Wandering the neighborhood’s streets, one is still able to envision Italian American immigrant life 100 years ago.

The heart of this area is around Mulberry and Grand Streets, where the Banca Stabile row at 181-189 Grand Street is located. This row originally dates from the 1830s. In the 1880s, the corner building at 189 Grand Street was converted to Banca Stabile. Like other local banks of its type, Banca Stabile played a central role in the residents’ lives. The row remains very much intact from its turn of the 20th century appearance. Notably, Banca Stabile’s historic banking hall also remains well preserved.

The Banca Stabile row is now under threat of demolition and redevelopment. The redevelopment will forever carve the heart out of Little Italy, not only destroying buildings that strongly contribute to the area’s history and architectural heritage, but inserting an out-of-scale, non-contextual building into an historic streetscape.

Unfortunately, the area’s Special Purpose Zoning and National Register district designations do not guarantee the preservation of Little Italy’s historic architecture. Therefore, we request that the Landmarks Preservation Commission move without delay to create a historic district to include the Banca Stabile row and the other historic buildings around this important intersection, as well as to review and calendar surrounding streets of intact historic buildings within Little Italy. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
President

 

LESPI's Testimony re: Landmarking Seward Park Library

March 20, 2013

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation for Seward Park Library, 192 East Broadway, Manhattan

Dear Chair Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to support designation of Seward Park Library as a New York City Individual Landmark. This wonderful neo-Renaissance style building, which remains in very good condition from its original construction, maintains a strong visual presence on East Broadway and beautifully frames the southeast corner of Seward Park.

As you know, at the turn of the 20th century the Carnegie Libraries were highly important neighborhood intellectual and cultural resources as well as local expressions of civic pride and aspiration. At the time of its construction, perhaps no other community was more suitable for a Carnegie Library than the Lower East Side’s immigrant community, and Seward Park Library’s architecture tells an important story about the lives and goals of the peoples it has served over many generations. It is a landmark in the true sense of the word: its architecture proudly and elegantly proclaims its presence on the streetscape, and speaks to the history of the surrounding neighborhood, in this case a history with tremendous local, national, and even international significance.

We request that the LPC vote without delay to designate the Seward Park Library as an Individual Landmark. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
President

 

LESPI's Testimony to NY City Council re: East Village / LES Historic District

TESTIMONY: NY City Council Landmarks Submcommittee January 29, 2013

RE: EAST VILLAGE / LOWER EAST SIDE HISTORIC DISTRICT


My name is Richard Moses, President of the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative, also known as LESPI. LESPI is a not-for-profit, grass roots, all volunteer organization dedicated to the preservation of the historic streetscapes of the East Village / Lower East Side.

We respectfully urge the Landmarks Subcommittee to vote to ratify landmark designation for the East Village / Lower East Side Historic District. The East Village has great local, city-wide and national importance for its central role in our culture's immigration, political, music, art, and theater history. This history is reflected in the area’s wonderful variety of beautifully ornate 19th and early 20th century architecture. The scale, materials and ornament of these historic buildings provide us today with a profoundly rich urban environment.

Development pressures in the East Village are intense and getting stronger all the time. Although the 2008 rezoning of the area established certain height limitations, the brute force of gentrification has resulted in ornate historic buildings and facades being demolished and replaced with generic glass and stucco boxes. Without landmark designation the historic East Village will be lost building by building and street by street.

There have been concerns raised about the religious properties in the district. When my great-grandmother first arrived in the Lower East Side from Russia 120 years ago, having been sent alone by her family as a teenager to escape the programs, she was disappointed that the streets were not literally paved in gold. But the countless religious buildings in the neighborhood did provide this aura. Although many of our community’s religious buildings have been lost over the years, those remaining continue as beacons, providing residents a sense of spiritual peace and reassurance as society becomes increasingly commercialized. Losing these magnificent structures would be a tragic loss for us all.

Based on our extensive outreach, we believe that the vast majority of the neighborhood’s residents want landmarking. We have gathered over 1,000 signatures in support of historic district designation in just a few petitioning sessions. Community Board 3 has voted in support of the district.

The East Village / Lower East Side Historic District will provide solid and necessary protection for its historic buildings and streetscapes. Historic district designation is the only way to effectively ensure that what we cherish about our neighborhoods will survive in the years to come. Please vote to ratify landmark designation for the East Village / Lower East Side Historic District with its current boundaries intact.

Thank you.

 

LESPI's Testimony to NYC Planning Commission re: East Village / LES Historic District

TESTIMONY: NYC PLANNING COMMISSION November 28, 2012

RE: EAST VILLAGE / LOWER EAST SIDE HISTORIC DISTRICT


My name is Richard Moses and I am President of Lower East Side Preservation Initiative, also known as LESPI. LESPI is a not-for-profit, grass roots, all volunteer organization dedicated to the preservation of the historic streetscapes of the East Village / Lower East Side.

We strongly support the Planning Commission’s vote to ratify landmark designation for the East Village / Lower East Side Historic District. The East Village is an integral part of the historic Lower East Side, an area of great local, city-wide and national importance for its central role in our culture's immigration, political, music, art, and theater history. This history is reflected in the area’s wonderful variety of beautifully ornate 19th and early 20th century architecture. The scale, materials and ornament of these historic buildings provide us today with beautiful historic streetscapes and a profoundly rich urban environment. By landmarking this district, the city is ensuring that we and future generations can appreciate this legacy, a legacy that truly belongs to the community and city as a whole.

Unfortunately, development pressures in the neighborhood are intense and getting stronger all the time. Although the 2008 rezoning of the area established certain height limitations, the brute force of gentrification has resulted in ornate historic buildings and facades being demolished and replaced with generic glass and stucco boxes. If we don’t act now to save the historic areas of the East Village they’ll be lost forever.

Based on our extensive outreach, we believe that the vast majority of the neighborhood’s residents want landmarking. We have gathered over 1,000 signatures in support of historic district designation. Community Board 3 has voted in support of the district.

The landmarking of the East Village / Lower East Side Historic District will provide solid protection for the district’s historic streetscapes. However, we are asking the Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission to continue moving forward to preserve additional intact areas of the historic Lower East Side, from the east side of Tompkins Square Park west to the Bowery and Broadway, and from 14th Street south to Chinatown, as these neighborhoods are very rich in history and architecture and under increasingly destructive development pressures as well. These communities provide a beautiful, unique and fascinating urban resource highly valued by New Yorkers and visitors alike. Landmark designation will not prevent change or freeze our streetscapes in time, nor should it. But it is the only way to effectively ensure that what we cherish about our neighborhoods will survive in the years to come.

Thank you.

 

LESPI's letter to BSA re: 2-26 Stanton Street redevelopment

November 9, 2012

The Honorable Meenakshi Srinivasan, A.I.C.P., Chair
NYC Board of Standards and Appeals
40 Rector Street
New York, NY 10006-1705

RE: BSA No. 299-82-BZ: 2-26 Stanton Street, a/k/a 207-217 Chrystie Street

Dear Chair Srinivasan:

Lower East Side Preservation Initiative requests that the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals deny Cammeby International’s request to reinstate air/development rights that do not currently exist and to uphold the May 2, 2012 Department of Buildings denial of the application for a new building at the referenced address – a 200,000 square foot, 25-story, 300-foot tall hotel/condominium - due to the size and scale of the proposed building’s design. (This assessment is based on our review of an outline streetscape elevation and three-dimensional rendering titled “Impact Study Depicting Proposed Development, 2-26 Stanton Street a/k/a 207-17 Chrystie Street”).

Manhattan’s Lower East Side has tremendous local and national historic significance as a home to immigrants and a wellspring of American culture. For several years, the intensity and insensitivity of local real estate development have been threatening the area’s historic character, and as a result in 2008 the National Trust for Historic Preservation included the Lower East Side in its list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. The proposed building would only exacerbate this situation considerably. It is completely out of scale and context with its neighbors, would visually detract from the area’s remaining historic streetscapes, and would cast long shadows over nearby streets and parkland. It should be rejected due to its significantly negative impact on the community’s urban environment and heritage.

We ask the BSA to require the applicants to produce an environmental impact study for the proposed building, and to not approve any application that is out of scale / character with the surrounding neighborhood.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc: Susan Stetzer, Manhattan Community Board 3

 

LESPI's Historic Preservation Section 106 Review of the Seward Park Redevelopment Project

July 19, 2012

Office of the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development
Robert R. Kulikowski, PhD.
Assisitant to the Mayor
253 Broadway, 14th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Seward Park Mixed-Use Redevelopment Project: Section 106 Review

Dear Dr. Kulikowski:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative – LESPI - has reviewed the Draft Environment Impact Statement for the Seward Park Mixed-Use Redevelopment Project.

As you know, there are several properties in and around the redevelopment site that have been identified as having architectural / historic significance that would be directly or indirectly impacted by the construction. Among these are the Essex Street Market, Fire Engine Company 17 at 185 Broome Street, St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, and The Dispensary Building. Additionally, the State and National Register Lower East Side Historic District and the potential (State and National Register Eligible) Clinton, Rivington, Stanton Street Historic District are within close proximity to the site.

We do not believe it is appropriate for state and federal funds to be used to demolish or significantly damage an historic site that is either listed or deemed eligible for listing in the State or National Register of Historic Places.

The Lower East Side is an area of immense historic significance to our city and country. This community has and continues to lose large numbers of historically and architecturally significant buildings at an alarmingly fast rate. Demolishing more of these buildings will further diminish this fragile historic neighborhood already pockmarked with insensitive development.

Several types of mitigation have been proposed. We strongly assert that mitigation for demolition typically does not come close to balancing the loss of the cultural / historical resource. Mitigations such as creating museum exhibits on a demolished building’s history within the new structure, and preserving a section of the building’s façade and building the new structure behind it (i.e. facadism) do not address historic preservation concerns or values.

The best way to minimize impacts on the area’s historic districts – either listed or considered eligible - is for the scale and materials of the new buildings to be sensitive to the surrounding historic sites. This does not mean that the new buildings should slavishly imitate the style of the historic buildings, or resort to apologetically bland generic designs. Conversely, it is most appropriate for the new design to be robustly modern, and to develop a dialogue with the historic buildings in the spirit of the robust architecture of the neighborhood’s historic structures.

Creative urban and architectural design can ensure that a new development takes its place comfortably on the Lower East Side, contributing to the area’s vital historic character and respectful of its rich architectural and historic resources.

LESPI is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, it is imperative that the city act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

Please feel free to email me at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or call at 347-827-1846. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc:
Margaret Chin, NY City Council
Gigi Li, Manhattan Community Board 3

 

LESPI's Public Hearing Testimony for Landmark Designation of the Proposed East Village / Lower East Side Historic District

TESTIMONY:
NYC LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE PROPOSED EAST VILLAGE / LOWER EAST SIDE HISTORIC DISTRICT
June 26, 2012

Good afternoon, my name is Richard Moses and I am President of Lower East Side Preservation Initiative, also known as LESPI.

I am here today to support, in the strongest and most emphatic way possible, landmark designation for the Proposed East Village / Lower East Side Historic District. The East Village is an integral part of the historic Lower East Side, an area of great local, city-wide and national importance for its central role in our culture's immigration, political, music, art and theater history. Its historic streets include a wonderfully rich variety of beautifully ornate 19th and early 20th century architecture. By landmarking this district, the city is ensuring that we and future generations can appreciate the physical evidence of its fascinating story and legacy.

As you know, development pressures in the neighborhood are intense and getting stronger all the time. Historic buildings are being demolished and defaced on an ongoing basis. If we don’t act now to save the historic areas of the East Village they’ll be lost forever - time is of the essence in designating this historic district.

There have been concerns raised about the religious buildings in the proposed district. When my great-grandmother first arrived in the Lower East Side from Russia 120 years ago, having been sent alone by her family at age 13 to escape the programs, she was disappointed that the streets were not literally paved in gold. But the countless religious buildings in the neighborhood did provide this aura. Although many of our community’s religious buildings have been lost over the years, those remaining continue as spiritual beacons, providing spiritual peace and reassurance for residents as society becomes increasingly commercialized. Losing these magnificent buildings would be a tragic loss for us all.

Based on our extensive outreach, we believe that the vast majority of the neighborhood’s residents want landmarking. We have gathered over 1,000 signatures in support of landmark preservation, which I have here, in just a few petitioning sessions. Community Board 3 has voted in support of the district.

Although the recent landmarking of the East 10th Street Historic District was a good first step toward the preservation of the historic Lower East Side, that district is only a single blockfront, and the landmarking of the much larger Proposed East Village / Lower East Side Historic District will go much further toward providing the area’s intact historic streetscapes the landmark protection they deserve.

Finally, we ask the LPC to continue moving forward to preserve additional intact streets of the historic Lower East Side, from the east side of Tompkins Square Park west to the Bowery and Broadway, and from 14th Street south to Chinatown, as these neighborhoods are very rich in history and architecture and under increasingly destructive development pressures as well. Thank you.

 

Landmark Designation for The Bowery Mission

June 8, 2012

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Via email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Re: Landmark Designation for The Bowery Mission, 227 Bowery, Manhattan

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to support LPC’s designation of The Bowery Mission at 227 Bowery as an Individual Landmark.

This well preserved Neo-Grec style building, which dates from 1876, has functioned as the Bowery Mission since 1909 when the Mission took over the property. The richly ornamented Tudor Revival window bay, inserted by the Mission during the building’s conversion, is an important and aesthetically attractive alteration that broadcasts the structure’s communal function and proclaims its welcome to the poor and needy.

The building’s conversion to philanthropic use marked an important transitional time in New York’s attitude toward its poorest residents. Jacob Riis’s 1890 How the Other Half Lives awakened many New Yorkers to the immense suffering of the city’s impoverished. In the decades following its publication, new philanthropic groups were organized, charitable facilities constructed, and legislation and programs for low income housing initiated. The Bowery Mission is a product of – and exemplifies – this era’s activist Progressivism and heightened compassion.

The Bowery Mission clearly warrants landmark protection on both historical architectural and cultural grounds. We request that the LPC designate this important structure as an Individual Landmark as soon as possible. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc: Hon. Margaret Chin, New York City Council

 

Landmark Designation for Bowery Bank Building

May 14, 2012

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation for The Bowery Bank of New York, 124 Bowery, Manhattan

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to support LPC’s designation of the former The Bowery Bank of New York, at 124 Bowery aka 230 Grand Street as an Individual Landmark. This Beaux Arts style building has a strong visual presence on the Bowery and has an aesthetically important relationship with the Bowery Savings Bank building, one of New York’s most cherished landmarks which flanks this building on either side.

The Bowery Bank building, constructed in 1901 by prominent architects York and Sawyer, is in the heart of the Lower East Side’s immigrant community. In New York, Beaux Arts architecture is perhaps stylistically unsurpassed in its outward expression of civic pride, virtue, stability and aspiration. 124 Bowery’s architecture tells an important story about the hopes and desires of the community it served: its monumental architecture proudly and emphatically proclaims its presence on the streetscape, and beautiful façade with classical ornamentation speaks of its long term contribution toward and commitment to the surrounding community. Today these values continue to ring true.

The building is a highly valued and irreplaceable architectural and cultural resource for both the Lower East Side and New York City as a whole. Its loss would diminish the architectural and cultural wealth of our community and city, as well as the Bowery Savings Bank’s architecture and aesthetics of the surrounding streetscapes. Only landmark status will ensure the preservation of this important structure.

We request that the LPC vote to designate 124 Bowery as an Individual Landmark as soon as possible. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

 

Landmark Designation for the Bowery

March 30, 2012

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Via mail and email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

re: The Bowery

Dear Commissioner Tierney:

Certainly the Bowery is one of our country’s best known thoroughfares. Its long and rich history in many ways mirrors –in perhaps an exaggerated way - the history of New York itself. From country road to commercial street to entertainment district to skid row to its current gentrification, the Bowery has seen highs and lows that are still very much evident in its buildings and streetscapes. Music, art, theater and literature have all thrived here. The Bowery has been a birthplace for many of the art forms we appreciate as truly American – vaudeville, jazz, abstract expressionism.

Now the Bowery as we know it, and as generations before us have known it, is rapidly disappearing. In order to preserve the Bowery it must be landmarked. The LPC must move quickly because development pressures are intense. We have already lost a lot; to lose the last semblances of what this storied street has meant to our city and country would be truly tragic.

There are questions regarding how much of the Bowery is intact enough to designate. The simplest approach is to first go after the “low hanging fruit:” the block between Grand and Broome Streets, east and west sides, is a wonderfully motley yet intact collection of early 19th to early 20th century styles that expresses the robust quality of the Bowery itself. The Federal, Italianate, Romanesque Revival, Classical Revival and early 20th century commercial vernacular buildings that jostle for attention compose a highly rich and spirited streetscape.

We were very disappointed to hear that LPC recently decided not bring this block forward as a Bowery historic district. Relatively minor alterations to buildings in an architecturally and historically valuable area should not be sufficient grounds to deny landmark protection. This raises the point of why, when LPC had already initiated the process of formally reviewing this district, were building owners allowed to demolish historic facade features. This incident and similar recent incidences in the East Village lead us to believe that it is time to reassess this aspect of the designation process.

We respectfully urge LPC to reexamine your decision regarding this district and instead move ahead without delay to landmark the Bowery between Grand and Broome Streets, and to review the rest of the Bowery, recently added to the State Register of Historic Places, to make sure we do not lose the Bowery’s varied and exuberant historic urban character that celebrates the very spirit of our city.

Thank you,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc: Hon. Margaret Chin, NY City Council

 

Landmark Designation for Horse Auction House

March 28, 2012

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation for Horse Auction House, 128 East 13th Street, Manhattan

Dear Chairman Tierney:

With its strong and unique architectural design and storied history, the Van Tassell & Kearney Horse Auction House at 128 East 13th Street is clearly a strong candidate for landmarking on both architectural and cultural grounds.

The 1903 structure, which had once served such wealthy New York families as the Vanderbilts and Belmonts, appears to be the last surviving example of a horse and carriage auction house in New York City. During World War II the building housed a training program for women working in wartime industry, part of a national effort that proved to be a milestone in the history of equal rights for woman. For many years it served as artist Frank Stella's sculpture studio: this seminal modern artist not only influenced a younger generation of artists but such prominent and influential architects as Frank Gehry.

Architecturally, the building's Beaux-Arts façade, defined by small ovular and round windows, a grand arch, and a barrel-vaulted roof profile, is highly distinctive. The bold and eye-catching composition and elegant but spare ornamentation reflect a wonderful aesthetic tension between honest functionality and gilded age embellishment.

Preservationists have been advocating for landmark protection for this building for quite some time. We ask the Commission to vote without delay to designate the Horse Auction House an Individual Landmark and grant this endangered historic structure the protection it deserves. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

Cc:
Honorable Rosie Mendez, NY City Council This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Susan Stetzer, Manhattan Community Board 3 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

LESPI's Public Hearing Testimony for Landmark Designation of the Proposed E 10th Street Historic District

TESTIMONY:
NYC LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE PROPOSED EAST 10TH STREET HISTORIC DISTRICT
January 17, 2012

Good afternoon. My name is Richard Moses and I am President of the Lower East Side Preservation Initiative, also known as LESPI.

I want to start by saying that LESPI strongly and unequivocally supports landmark designation for the Proposed East 10th Street Historic District.

East 10th Street between Avenues A and B is one of if not the most significant blockfront in the East Village. This exceptional collection of historic structures has survived in remarkably good condition over the years. The buildings run a gamut of mid 19th to early 20th century types and styles that are a fascinating microcosm of the important architectural and social transformations that took place in the East Village at that time. Moreover, this street’s commanding presence at the north end of Tompkins Square Park – considered to be the “heart” of the East Village - provides a wonderful iconic view from within the park and serves as a landmark to passersby in the truest sense of the word.

In addition to its rich architecture, the East Village / Lower East Side is nationally known for its immigration, artistic, and political cultural history. It is essential that as a city we protect the relatively few historic streetscapes that still survive here. The proposed East 10th Street Historic District is one such blockfront that is now deservedly at the front of the line for landmark designation.

The East Village’s historic architecture has been and continues to be under a sustained assault from real estate development that typically does not respect this neighborhood’s unique heritage. As you know, in 2008 the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed Manhattan’s Lower East Side – which historically included the East Village - as one of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places, and since then the destruction has only accelerated. Without landmark protection, the historic Lower East Side including the East Village will be virtually eliminated through demolition and architectural defacement. The community is well aware of this danger: as you know CB6 is in support of designation, and to date, from only a few tabling sessions in Tompkins Square Park, we have gathered over 1,000 signatures asking LPC to protect the EV/LES’s historic streetscapes, which I have with me here.

We thank the Commission’s staff for their excellent work on the Proposed East 10th Street Historic District, and respectfully urge the Commission to vote to landmark without delay. We also ask that LPC move quickly to hold a public hearing for and landmark the Proposed East Village / Lower East Side Historic District, whose historic buildings remain in danger until they enjoy full landmark district protection, and to move ahead to protect all of the East Village / Lower East Side’s intact historic streetscapes.

Thank you very much.

 

Landmark Designation for the Proposed E 10th Street Historic District

December 22, 2011

Robert Tierney, Chair
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Designation of the Proposed East 10th Street Historic District

Dear Chair Tierney:

Lower East Side Preservation Initiative – LESPI – strongly and unequivocally supports landmark designation for the Proposed East 10th Street Historic District. We loudly applaud the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s move to quickly designate this district in order to prevent it from being potentially compromised by the construction of a rooftop addition, and thank the Commission’s staff for their hard work on this proposed designation.

The blockfront on East 10th Street between Avenues A and B is perhaps the most significant in the East Village. This striking collection of historic structures has survived in remarkably good condition over the years and retains its uniform scale. The buildings run a gamut of mid 19th to early 20th century types and styles, including rowhouses, tenements, and an institutional building, in styles as diverse as Greek Revival, neo-Gothic, Italianate, neo-Grec and neoclassical. Situated at the north end of Tompkins Square Park in the “heart” of the East Village, this historic streetscape provides a wonderful iconic view from within the park and serves as a landmark to passersby in the truest sense of the word.

LESPI’s mission is to advocate for the preservation of the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. Our focus is on historic streetscapes, which we believe truly reflect the history and architecture of this community. Historically the street is where much of the neighborhood’s life was lived (and continues to be lived), so it is not surprising that the East Village / Lower East Side’s historic buildings – the rowhouses and tenements peppered with small institutional and commercial buildings - can only be truly understood and appreciated in context with their neighboring structures. The Proposed East 10th Street Historic District fits this model. With the EV / LES’s historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save these locally and nationally important neighborhoods’ intact historic resources for current and future generations

We urge the LPC to move as quickly as possible to landmark the Proposed East 10th Street Historic District. We also ask that LPC move without delay to hold a public hearing for and landmark the Proposed East Village / Lower East Side Historic District, whose historic buildings remain in danger of demolition, defacement and damage as well. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard D. Moses
President

cc:
Hon. Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President
Hon. Rosie Mendez, New York City Council
Kate Daly, NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission

 

Landmark Designation for Bialystoker Home

November 8, 2011

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Re: Landmark Designation for the Bialystoker Home, 228 East Broadway, Manhattan

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to support designation of the Bialystoker Home at 228 East Broadway as a New York City Individual Landmark. This Art Deco style building dating from 1931 maintains a prominent visual presence on the streetscape and clearly meets the criteria for landmarking on architectural and cultural grounds.

The building’s monumental massing and characteristic Art Deco ornament, including the building’s name over the entry spelled out in letters in a Hebrew style, marks the institution’s importance to the surrounding Jewish community at the time of its construction: as the New York Times reported in 1931: “twenty-five years to the day after many of their number had fled from a pogrom in Bialystok, Russia, more than 5,000 Jews crowded East Broadway between Clinton and Montgomery Streets…and witnessed the opening and dedication….”

The Bialystoker Home is an important example of the historic institutional buildings peppered around the Lower East Side. During the decades around the turn of the 20th century, these facilities provided lifeblood for poor and struggling immigrant families. The relationship between the Lower East Side’s tenement residential buildings and more architecturally prominent institutional buildings is essential to our understanding of the immigrant experience at that time. The Bialystoker Home must be preserved as a critical component of the Lower East Side’s architectural and cultural history.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic buildings falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the intact historic resources of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We urge the LPC to vote to designate the Bialystoker Home as an Individual Landmark as soon as possible. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Ratcliffe
Vice President

cc: Hon. Margaret S. Chin, New York City Council This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Landmark Designation Affirmation 135 Bowery.

July 19, 2011

Councilmember Margaret Chin
165 Park Row, Suite #11
New York, NY 10038

Via email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Re: 135 Bowery Landmark Designation

Dear Councilmember Chin:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to strongly support the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission’s recent designation of 135 Bowery as a New York City Individual Landmark.

135 Bowery is a striking and basically intact example of the Federal style architecture that dominated the city during its post Revolutionary War period, when New York was on the verge of the intensive growth that would bring it to prominent status on the world stage. The rare surviving examples of this architecture – including 135 Bowery - serve to remind and educate today’s and future New Yorkers of the small scale and simple yet elegant architecture that once dominated Manhattan. These buildings deserve protection from demolition and insensitive alteration.

We also believe that the landmarking of 135 Bowery should be part of a concerted effort by the city to save the Bowery’s unique and very threatened historic architectural resources.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We respectfully request that you vote for and help lead the City Council toward final approval of landmark status for 135 Bowery. Landmark designation is the only viable means to preserve this important historic building.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

Cc: Kate Daly, NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

 

Landmark Designation for former Citizens Savings Bank, 150 Canal St.

March 21, 2011

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to support designation of 150 Canal Street, the former Citizens Savings Bank, as a New York City Individual Landmark. This Beaux Arts style building maintains a strong visual presence at Bowery and Canal Street and has an aesthetically symbiotic relationship with the Manhattan Bridge nearby.

In New York, Beaux Arts architecture is perhaps stylistically unsurpassed in its outward expression of civic pride, virtue and aspiration. This bank building, constructed in 1924 in the heart of the Lower East Side’s immigrant community, tells an important story about the aspirations and expectations of the communities it served: its monumental form, rich materials and details, and prominent location served as a beacon in a neighborhood dominated by multiple family residences of simpler and less monumental design. The building is a landmark in the true sense of the word: its architecture proudly and emphatically proclaims its presence on the streetscape, and provides a wonderful marker for navigating the surrounding area.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic buildings falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the intact historic resources of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We urge the LPC to vote to designate 150 Canal Street as an Individual Landmark as soon as possible. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

 

Landmark Designation for 35 Cooper Square

November 10, 2010

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to strongly support designation of the Federal style 35 Cooper Square as a New York City Individual Landmark. Although we applaud LPC’s recent efforts to save the remaining Federal style buildings in lower Manhattan, this building was unfortunately left unprotected by the Commission and is now in danger of demolition.

Built in the early 19th century, 35 Cooper Square has remained relatively intact since its construction. It is a particularly good example of New York City Federal architecture. Its small scale, simple elegance and distinctive roof configuration serve as a striking reminder of the Lower East Side’s character two centuries ago.

Research indicates that the building was built by Peter Stuyvesant’s great-grandson as a rental property; during the mid 20th century it housed and received renowned artists, writers and actors who helped define lower Manhattan’s rich artistic life. The area around Cooper Square remains one of the city’s most historically important and architecturally and socially vibrant neighborhoods. But unchecked and uncontrolled development has been literally bulldozing the area’s architectural and historical heritage, building by building.

35 Cooper Square must be preserved for its important Federal architecture and noteworthy history. Along with other rare surviving examples of New York’s Federal style architecture, this building deserves protection from demolition and insensitive alteration. We urge the LPC to vote to designate 35 Cooper Square as a NYC Landmark without delay.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

 

Landmark Designation for 326 and 328 East 4th Street

September 20, 2010

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Via email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Re: Landmark Designation for 326 and 328 East 4th Street

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to strongly support designation of 326 and 328 East 4th Street as New York City Individual Landmarks. These buildings are under imminent threat and we urge that the LPC act quickly to protect these important local historic sites.

Nos. 326 and 328 are beautiful and essentially intact examples of Greek Revival style residential architecture, constructed in the 1830s as part of a row of houses. They mark an important era in the early history of the East Village, with strong ties to the waterfront businesses that once predominated along the Lower East Side’s shoreline. There are very few of these structures still extant in the community, and these buildings absolutely deserve landmark protection. Otherwise they face planned alterations that are almost certain to destroy their architectural and historic integrity.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We urge the LPC to vote to give 326 and 328 East 4th Street full landmark protection as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

Cc: Hon. Scott Stringer, Manhattan Borough President, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Hon. Rosaura Mendez, NY City Councilmember, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Susan Stetzer, District Manager CB3, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

 

Landmark Designation for 135 Bowery

August 24, 2010

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to strongly support designation of 135 Bowery as a New York City Individual Landmark. We applaud LPC’s calendaring of this property, as well as your recent efforts to save the remaining Federal style buildings in lower Manhattan.

135 Bowery is a striking and relatively intact example of the Federal style architecture that dominated the city during its post Revolutionary War period, when New York was on the verge of the intensive growth that would bring it to prominent status on the world stage. The rare surviving examples of this architecture – including 135 Bowery - serve to remind and educate today’s and future New Yorkers of the small scale and simple yet elegant architecture that once dominated Manhattan. These buildings deserve protection from demolition and insensitive alteration.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan’s East Village / Lower East Side. With historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We urge the LPC to vote to give 135 Bowery full landmark protection as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

 

Rezoning the East Side of the Bowery

March 31, 2010

Amanda Burden
Chair
NYC Department of City Planning
22 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007-1216

Dear Ms. Burden:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative (LESPI) strongly supports rezoning the east side of the Bowery in order to help protect this historic thoroughfare from further overscaled and inappropriate development. The Bowery is a nationally known street that has had a central and at times notorious role in New York’s history, dating back to its earliest years. Its very rich cultural and architectural history is still strongly reflected in the mix of low to mid rise buildings that line it.

From its beginnings as a rural route to its bawdy 19th century mix of taverns and bordellos, its 20th century impoverishment, its role in punk and alternative music history, and now its current mix of the chic and economically struggling, the Bowery has encompassed the diverse and contradictory characteristics of the city itself. The scale and historic resources of this street must be preserved now before the next real estate boom leads to more senseless demolition and overdevelopment. If this street’s historic scale and physical fabric are lost, the entire city will lose a critical and tangible link to its past. Notably the NY State Historic Preservation Office recently determined this area to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.

LESPI is a group of local residents and preservationists who want to preserve what remains of the historic architecture and streetscapes of Manhattan’s Lower East Side. LESPI is particularly interested in protecting the Lower East Side’s historic streetscapes.

We urge the Planning Commission to extend the rezoning of the Lower East Side to include the Bowery’s east side, in order to help protect it from the forces of homogenized and insensitive development that run rampant in so much of our city.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Marci Reaven
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Philip Van Aver

 

Designation for the Orthodox Church in America Cathedral of the Holy Virgin Protection

November 16, 2009

Honorable Robert Tierney, Chairman
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10007

Dear Chairman Tierney:

The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative - LESPI - is writing to strongly support designation of the Orthodox Church in America Cathedral of the Holy Virgin Protection, at 59 East Second Street in Manhattan, as a New York City Individual Landmark. We applaud the recent calendaring of this property by LPC for a public hearing.

Designed by architect Josiah C. Cody in a Gothic Revival / Romanesque style, the church visually dominates the streetscape with its imposing and individualistic design. Located across the street from the landmarked Marble Cemetery, it serves as a powerful marker of the Lower East Side's history: the church is clearly an outstanding East Village landmark.

Additionally, we support landmarking of Congregation Mezritch Synagogue, at 415 East 6th Street, and 101 Avenue A. These buildings have not yet been calendared. The Congregation Mezritch Synagogue, constructed in 1910, is an exceptional classical design that adeptly conveys monumentality appropriate for a house of worship within the tight confines of a New York City lot. This building speaks to the resourcefulness and pride of the immigrant groups who have settled and continue to settle in this neighborhood.

101 Avenue A, constructed in 1876, is a fine example of neo-Grec tenement architecture. Its fascinating cultural history reflects the history of the East Village itself - from its late 19th century use as a German-American community hall, to its more recent use as the Pyramid Club, which for 30 years has been a venue for introducing now renowned musical talent and drag performers.

LESPI is an organization dedicated to preserving the architectural, historical and cultural heritage of Manhattan's East Village / Lower East Side. We believe that these sites are invaluable parts of our community's architectural and cultural heritage. With the East Village and Lower East Side's historic resources falling prey to demolition and defacement on an almost daily basis, we believe that the LPC must act now to save the historically intact areas of these locally and nationally important historic neighborhoods for current and future generations.

We have enclosed our brochure for your reference. We ask that the LPC move to give these sites full landmark protection as soon as possible.

Sincerely,

Richard Moses
Steering Committee Member

LESPI Steering Committee:
Britton Baine
Carolyn Ratcliffe
Marci Reaven
Katy McNabb
Richard Moses
Philip Van Aver

 



The Lower East Side Preservation Initiative is dedicated to preserving the historic streetscapes of the Lower East Side, including the East Village, Lower East Side below Houston Street, Bowery, Chinatown and Little Italy